Research Paper: Validating Confidential Blockchain Transactions with Zero-Knowledge Proof

By April 25, 2019 网志, Hyperledger Indy

By: Carlo Gutierrez and Alex Khizhniak, Altoros

A new document explains how blockchain transactions can be verified without having to reveal the details. Some of the model’s implementations include Idemix and Hyperledger Indy.

Transparency is considered by many to be one of blockchain’s most important traits. However, there are businesses, such as those in finance, which deal with sensitive information. In these situations, transparency takes a step behind privacy. For organizations operating with confidential information, implementing blockchain transactions with zero-knowledge proof (ZKP) is a solution to consider.

Altoros, a General Member of Hyperledger and an expert in blockchain development and training, has released a research paper exploring how to ensure privacy while still providing transparency on a blockchain.

Who can benefit from ZKP?

In a nutshell, ZKP is a method in cryptography where a prover can convince a verifier that it knows a secret value, without actually disclosing any information apart from the fact that it knows the secret value. While this requires some input from the verifier (e.g., challenging a response), there is also a form of this model called noninteractive ZKP, which does not require such an interaction between the two parties.

Avoiding linkability between certificates using ZKP protocols such as Idemix (Image credit)

Applications that benefit from ZKP are those that require a measure of data privacy. Some of these example applications include:

Authentication systems. The development of ZKP was inspired by authentication systems, where one party needed to prove its identity to a second party through some secret information, but without revealing the secret altogether.

Anonymous systems. ZKP can enable blockchain transactions to be validated without the need to reveal the identity of the users making a transaction.

Confidential systems. Similar to anonymous systems, ZKP can instead be used to validate blockchain transactions without revealing pertinent information, such as financial details.

ZKP implementations: Idemix and Hyperledger

In Hyperledger Fabric, privacy-preserving authentication and transfer or certified attributes can be done using Identity Mixer (Idemix), a ZKP-based cryptographic protocol. Its implementation consists of the three components:

  • A core Idemix cryptopackage (in Golang), which implements basic cryptographic algorithms (key generation, signing, verification, and zero-knowledge proofs)
  • MSP implementation for signing and verifying transactions using the Identity Mixer cryptopackage
  • A CA service for issuing ECert credentials using the Identity Mixer cryptopackage

The Idemix architecture within Hyperledger Fabric

This combination provides:

  • anonymity (sending transactions without having to reveal your identity)
  • unlinkability (sending multiple transactions without revealing that all the transactions come from the same source)

Based on Idemix, the Hyperledger Indy project was built for managing decentralized, independent digital identity. It utilizes the so-called Indy-anoncreds to cryptographically secure credentials. Just a couple of days ago, it was announced that The Hyperledger Technical Steering Committee (TSC) had approved Indy to graduate from incubation to the active status.

For more details on ZKP, the zkSNARK protocol, and noninteractive ZKP implementations (such as Idemix and Indy), check out the full research paper.